Phospho-mTOR (S2448) Mouse anti-Human, Mouse, PerCP-eFluor 710, Clone: MRRBY, eBioscience™

Mouse Monoclonal Antibody

Overview
Brand: Affymetrix eBioscience

Manufacturer Part Number: 46-9718-41

Code: NEW

Additional Details:
Additional Details: Weight: 0.23750kg



Disclaimers: For Research Use Only.

Product Code. 15579426

Quantity Price
1 £ 92.86 / 25 tests
EU Stock 4
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Description and Specification

Specification

Quantity 25 tests
Antigen Phospho-mTOR (S2448)
Isotype IgG2a
Clone MRRBY
Storage Requirements Store at 2-8°C. Do not freeze. Light-sensitive material. This tandem dye is sensitive to photo-induced oxidation. Protect this vial from light during storage
Primary or Secondary Primary
Format Conjugated
Gene Alias mammalian target of rapamycin, FRAP, RAFT
Monoclonal or Polyclonal Monoclonal
Formulation aqueous buffer, 0.09% sodium azide, may contain carrier protein/stabilizer
Host Species Mouse
Regulatory Status RUO
Species Reactivity Human, Mouse
Concentration 5μL (0.125μg)/test
Conjugate PerCP-eFluor 710
Applications Flow Cytometry (Intracellular Staining)

This MRRBY monoclonal antibody recognizes human and mouse mammalian target of rapamycin (also known as mTOR, FRAP, RAFT) when phosphorylated on S2448. mTOR is a serine/threonine protein kinase that functions as an ATP and amino acid sensor as well as to balance nutrient availability with cell growth, proliferation, motility, survival, protein synthesis, and transcription. Activated mTOR increases production of enzymes necessary for glycolysis and controls the uptake of glucose and other nutrients. Increased glucose uptake and metabolism helps fulfill the energy needs for mTOR-driven cell growth and proliferation. When sufficient nutrients are available, mTOR transmits a positive signal to p70 S6 kinase and participates in the inactivation of the eIF4E inhibitor, 4E-BP1. mTOR is phosphorylated at S2448 via the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway and is autophosphorylated at Ser2481. Due to its critical role in regulation of cell growth, survival, and metabolism, and because it is often abnormally regulated in tumors, mTOR is under investigation as a potential target for anti-cancer therapy.